Reaching Others University at Buffalo - The State University of New York
 

Dr. Michelle Young’s Lecture and Workshop: Developing the Next Generation of School Level Leaders

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, The Center for Comparative and Global Studies in Education, and the endowment for the Willower Fund Lecture are pleased to present: Developing the Next Generation of School Level Leaders with Michelle Young, Ph.D. Executive Director of the University Council for Educational Administration   Saturday,  October 18, 2014 Norton […]

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, The Center for Comparative and Global Studies in Education, and the endowment for the Willower Fund Lecture are pleased to present:

Developing the Next Generation of School Level Leaders
with
Michelle Young, Ph.D.
Executive Director of the University Council for Educational Administration

 

Saturday,  October 18, 2014
Norton Hall, Room 218
9:00am – 1:30pm


(8:30om:
check in and continental breakfast;9:00om: lecture and workshop; lunch also provided )

 

Abstract: The complexity of leading our nation’s public schools continues to increase with every passing day. Contributing to this complexity are heightened external pressures to increase student and school performance and an increasingly diverse student population. Public schools are charged with ensuring quality educational  experiences  for all students, and  a  single school may serve students from a variety of cultural and racial communities, who  speak upwards of 30 different languages, who have a range of educational and background experiences, and who represent the full spectrum of cognitive and physical abilities. Although, teachers play the most visible and direct role in supporting student learning, educational leaders are responsible for ensuring that aII of the students enrolled in their school or school system have quality teachers and equitable opportunities to access valuable educational experiences within a learning focused educational culture. But, are they prepared to do so? Traditional approaches to preparing and developing educational leaders will not adequately prepare them to successfully lead within the contemporary public school system. Every year tens or thousands of educational leaders participate in formal leadership preparation and development courses and seminars; it is essential that those experiences be powerful. During this talk, I will discuss powerful learning for educational leaders and demonstrate several Powerful Learning Experiences (PLE) drawn from the University Council for Educational Administration’s (UCEA) Leaders Supporting Diverse Learners (LSDL) curriculum module initiative.

About Dr. Michelle Young

Michelle YoungMichelle D. Young, Ph.D., is the Executive Director of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) and a Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy at the University of Virginia. Dr. Young’s scholarship focuses on how university programs,educational policies and school leaders can support equitable and quality experiences for all students and adults who learn and work in schools. UCEA is an international consortium of research institutions with master and doctoral level programs in educational leadership and administration. As Executive Director of UCEA, Young works with universities, practitioners, professional organizations and state and national leaders to improve the preparation and practice of school and school system leaders and to develop a dynamic base of knowledge on excellence in educational leadership. Young has been instrumental in increasing the focus of research on leadership preparation and to bring research to bear on the work of educational leadership faculty members and policy makers.

Registration is free! RSVP at http://bit.ly/1rHoKMi

Questions? Contact Monica Washington at (716) 645-1350 or mcw22@buffalo.edu

 

 


Dr. Scott Thomas’ Lecture: Markets, Mission, and the Public Good

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, the Center for Comparative and Global Studies in Education, the Willower Fund, and the Holloway Fund endowments are pleased to present: Markets, Mission, and the Public Good: the Future of Higher Education Through Equity in Primary and Secondary Schooling Scott Thomas, Ph.D. Professor of Education and Dean Claremont […]

The Department of Educational Leadership and Policy, the Center for Comparative and Global Studies in Education, the Willower Fund, and the Holloway Fund endowments
are pleased to present:

Markets, Mission, and the Public Good: the Future of Higher Education Through Equity in Primary and Secondary Schooling

Scott Thomas, Ph.D.
Professor of Education and Dean
Claremont Graduate University


Thursday, September 25, 2014

Baldy Center for Law & Social Policy, 511 O’Brian Hall
Noon – Light lunch will be served
1 pm – Lecture will begin

Abstract: In this talk I will argue that, across the 20th century, we aggressively built an education system designed to achieve a set of publicly understandable goals. But even before the end of the Cold War we found ourselves with an obligation that outpaced our willingness to sustain the significant commitments made to education as a vehicle for economic, political, and social vitality. The rationale enabling the large public post World War II investment in the infrastructure of today¹s education system is increasingly indefensible as we continue to recast our post WWII “nation building” stance into the individual earnings and career building stance defining the first half of this century. But there are limits to this shift and the demographic realities facing our schools and colleges now force a choice between contraction in the postsecondary sector or a deeper public investment in elementary and secondary schools to better ensure the academic qualifications of students from non-affluent backgrounds. In today¹s market parlance, this is the largest untapped market segment for institutions in the postsecondary sector — but the barriers of inadequate preparation and affordability present steep challenges to the matriculation and success of these students. I will argue that these challenges are coincident with the latent public imperative of educational opportunity.

?page=assets-content.uploads.2016.06.Photo-Scott-Thomas.pngAbout Dr. Scott Thomas: Scott L. Thomas is professor and dean of the School of Educational Studies at Claremont Graduate University. He earned a PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara and has held faculty positions at the University of Georgia’s Institute of Higher Education, the University of Arizona’s Center for the Study of Higher Education, and the University of Hawaii at Mânoa (where he served as the founding director of the Hawaii Educational Policy Center). His research focuses on issues of student success and stratification of opportunity in higher education. Thomas is the editor in chief at the Journal of Higher Education, one of the premier journals in the field of higher education and he co-edits (with David Palfreyman and Ted Tapper of Oxford University) the book series International Studies in Higher Education (published by Taylor & Francis).

Registrations free! RSVP at http://bit.ly/1uHmaEZ

Questions? Contact Monica Washington at (716) 645-1350 or mcw22@buffalo.edu

Click here to view the flyer.


Dr. Fazal Rizvi’s Lecture: Discourses of Asia Rising and the Dynamics of New Class Formation in Elite Schools

Department of Educational Leadership and Policy EDUCATIONAL CULTURE, POLICY AND SOCIETY BROWN BAG SERIES PRESENTS Discourses of Asia Rising and the Dynamics of New Class Formation in Elite Schools Fazal Rizvi Professor in Global Studies in Education at the University of Melbourne/ Emeritus Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign PLEASE JOIN US NOON […]

Department of Educational Leadership and Policy
EDUCATIONAL CULTURE, POLICY AND SOCIETY
BROWN BAG SERIES
PRESENTS

Discourses of Asia Rising and the Dynamics of
New Class Formation in Elite Schools

Fazal Rizvi
Professor in Global Studies in Education at the University of Melbourne/
Emeritus Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

PLEASE JOIN US
NOON – 1:30PM
FRIDAY, APRIL 11TH
479 BALDY HALL

In recent years, a triumphalist discourse about the rise of Asia as an economic and political power has emerged in many parts of Asia. This discourse expresses a post-colonial confidence that suggests that the legacies of colonialism have finally been washed out, and that, in an era of globalization, Asian societies will continue to grow in stature. This confidence is widely, though not uniformly, found among the Asian middle class residing in metropolitan areas. In this paper, I want to use data collected from a large international project examining the dynamics of new class formations in elite schools established during the 19th century in the image of British public schools to explore some of the ways in which the elite schools in Asia relate to the discourse of ‘Asia rising’. In particular, I want to discuss how the discourse of ‘Asia rising’ constitutes a social imaginary through which elite schools in Asia are now negotiating the forces of globalization, making global connections in order to position themselves in a transnational space of privilege.

Fazal Rizvi was educated in India, Australia and the UK, and is currently a professor in Global Studies in Education at the University of Melbourne and an emeritus professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the United States. He is also a fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and a board member of the Asia Education Foundation. He has published extensively on issues of identity and culture in transnational contexts, theories of globalization and education policy and more recently Indian higher education. His latest book is Encountering Education in the Global.

This event is co-sponsored by The Center for Comparative and Global Studies in Education.

Refreshments Provided


2013 Graduate School of Education Open House on November 7

Student Union Lobby, North Campus Thursday, November 7, 2013 5 p.m. – 7 p.m. Want to be an educational leader,  teacher, counselor, librarian, information specialist, or work in education? The Graduate School of Education Open House will allow you to get information and meet with faculty from all of GSE’s departments, programs, and majors. If […]

GSE logo color

OpenHouse

Student Union Lobby, North Campus
Thursday, November 7, 2013
5 p.m. – 7 p.m.

Want to be an educational leader,  teacher, counselor, librarian, information specialist, or work in education? The Graduate School of Education Open House will allow you to get information and meet with faculty from all of GSE’s departments, programs, and majors. If you aren’t sure what you’re looking to do, but you want to pursue a degree in education, this is the best event to attend.

Meet faculty and staff to discuss Graduate Programs offered by:

  • Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology
  • Educational Leadership and Policy
  • Learning and Instruction
  • Library and Information Studies
  • Teacher Education Institute

Register Now!


Dr. Stephen Jacobson Named UB Distinguished Professor

Dr. Stephen Jacobson, Professor and Coordinator of the Educational Administration program of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy has been named a UB Distinguished Professor, effective September 1, 2013. Dr. Jacobson was recognized for his significant scholarly accomplishments in the field of educational administration and finance as well as his excellent contributions to the […]

Stephen JacobsonDr. Stephen Jacobson, Professor and Coordinator of the Educational Administration program of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy has been named a UB Distinguished Professor, effective September 1, 2013. Dr. Jacobson was recognized for his significant scholarly accomplishments in the field of educational administration and finance as well as his excellent contributions to the Graduate School of Education and the University at Buffalo.

 

Distinguihed Prof

10th Annual Celebration of Faculty and Staff Academic Excellence 

“The award of UB Distinguished Professor is a recognition of your outstanding record of scholarship and your contributions to our teaching and public service missions,” said UB President Satish Tripathi. “Your scholarship has received high praise from some of the leading authorities in your discipline across the country, and we are confident that you will continue to bring honor and esteem to UB in the years ahead.”

Dr. Jacobson’s professional interests include teacher compensation, the reform of school leadership preparation and practice, and effective principal leadership in challenging schools. His published works include 6 books, 26 book chapters, and nearly 40 articles in such leading peer-refereed journals as Educational Administration Quarterly, Journal of Educational Administration, Journal of Human Resources, Educational Evaluation, and Policy Analysis and Urban Education. In addition, Dr. Jacobson has given invited presentations throughout the U.S., as well as in Australia, Austria, Barbados, Canada, China, Cyprus, England, Germany, Israel, Mali, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, and Sweden. He is a past president of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) and of the American Education Finance Association. Dr. Jacobson is currently a co-director (with Kenneth Leithwood) of the UCEA Center for the Study of School-Site Leadership, and a co-editor (with Leithwood) of the journal, Leadership and Policy in Schools. In 1994, he received the Jack Culbertson Award from the UCEA for outstanding contributions to the field of educational administration by a junior professor.


Dr. Bruce Johnstone’s New Book: Higher Education Systems 3.0

After editing the recent book entitled Universities and colleges as economic drivers: Measuring higher education’s role in economic development, Jason Lane and D. Bruce Johnstone edited another new book entitled Higher education systems 3.0: Harnessing systemness, delivering performance. Dr. Johnstone is SUNY Distinguished Service Professor of Higher and Comparative Education Emeritus, former Chancellor of the […]

After editing the recent book entitled Universities and colleges as economic drivers: Measuring higher education’s role in economic development, Jason Lane and D. Bruce Johnstone edited another new book entitled Higher education systems 3.0: Harnessing systemness, delivering performance. Dr. Johnstone is SUNY Distinguished Service Professor of Higher and Comparative Education Emeritus, former Chancellor of the SUNY system, and former President of Buffalo State College. These books are part of a series edited by Lane and Johnstone called Critical issues in higher education. The series is published by SUNY Press and comes out of yearly conferences that take on major issues in higher education. These books help to inform SUNY-wide understandings of higher education with each containing contributions by Nancy Zimpher, our current SUNY Chancellor, and are emerging as a great source of pride at the press.

Source:
Dimitriadis, G. (2013, September 24). Re: Critical issues in higher education [Electronic mailing list message].  Retrieved from the GSE-FACULTY-LIST.


New UB Program to Fill Demand for Teachers of Chinese

With Chinese now the second-most-common secondary language in America and the most spoken language on the globe, UB’s Graduate School of Education will launch a new program to train a cadre of educators to teach primary and secondary students Chinese language and culture. The new program designed to meet the rising demand to teach Chinese […]

hayes hall sky

With Chinese now the second-most-common secondary language in America and the most spoken language on the globe, UB’s Graduate School of Education will launch a new program to train a cadre of educators to teach primary and secondary students Chinese language and culture.

The new program designed to meet the rising demand to teach Chinese as a second language will prepare teachers in New York State primary and secondary schools, and in particular those in Western New York.

“Chinese is the No.1 spoken language in the world,” says Dr. Janina Brutt-Griffler, professor of foreign language education and director of the Center for Comparative and Global Studies in Education. “If you count those people for whom Chinese is spoken as a second language, that number jumps to 1.1 billion.”

Dr. Brutt-Griffler has taken that demand of worldwide proportions, matched it with the UB2020 strategic priority to develop students as global citizens and worked with a colleague, Dr. Erin Kearney, assistant professor in foreign language education, to design the program. The two educators will deliver a program with special emphasis on the local education scene to train teachers perfectly positioned to fulfill this trend.

Source:
Anzalone, C. (2013, August 8). UB program to fill demand for teachers of Chinese. UB Reporter. Retrieved from http://www.buffalo.edu/ubreporter.html


Dr. William Barba’s Message for New Students and Parents

Dr. William Barba welcomed all of the parents at the New Student Orientation over the summer 2013. There were eight sessions in total and each session had between 350-400 parents attending. Dr. Barba gave the parents a background of what to expect in college and what obstacles and benefits that their students might find at […]

alumni arena

William BarbaDr. William Barba welcomed all of the parents at the New Student Orientation over the summer 2013. There were eight sessions in total and each session had between 350-400 parents attending. Dr. Barba gave the parents a background of what to expect in college and what obstacles and benefits that their students might find at a research university such as UB.

 


Dr. Bruce Johnstone’s Invited Lecture at Financing Higher Education Conference in Poland

Dr. Bruce Johnstone was invited in June 2013 to lecture at a conference, Financing Higher Education, at Lazarski University, sponsored by the US Economy and Trans-Atlantic Relations Institute of Lazarski University. His lecture was entitled: Student Loans Worldwide: Critical Options and Issues. The lecture began with a quandary: On the one hand, the increasing need […]

JohnstoneDr. Bruce Johnstone was invited in June 2013 to lecture at a conference, Financing Higher Education, at Lazarski University, sponsored by the US Economy and Trans-Atlantic Relations Institute of Lazarski University. His lecture was entitled: Student Loans Worldwide: Critical Options and Issues. The lecture began with a quandary: On the one hand, the increasing need for cost-sharing in its various forms and thus the need for student loans to allow students to invest in their higher education and to bring in revenue to supplement increasingly scarce and inadequate tax revenues. On the other hand, most student loans programs in the world have failed to provide a robust and sustainable stream of revenues. The lecture illustrated why most student loan schemes fail, observing that the problems were mainly both predictable and avoidable and concluded with nine principles of workable student loan programs.


Dr. Bruce Johnstone’s 14th Annual William H. Demas Memorial Lecture in St. Lucia

At the May 2013 Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Caribbean Development Bank, Dr. Bruce Johnstone was invited to give the 14th Annual William H. Demas Memorial Lecture entitled Financing Higher Education in the Caribbean: The Elusive Quest for Quality, Capacity, Affordability, and Equity. On the following day Dr. Johnstone gave a presentation to […]

Bruce Johnstone_InClassAt the May 2013 Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Caribbean Development Bank, Dr. Bruce Johnstone was invited to give the 14th Annual William H. Demas Memorial Lecture entitled Financing Higher Education in the Caribbean: The Elusive Quest for Quality, Capacity, Affordability, and EquityOn the following day Dr. Johnstone gave a presentation to the Directors entitled: Making Student Loans Work in the Caribbean States. The concluding recommendations of the public lecture, which is on the Website of the Bank, were the following five:

  1. focus on improving access and success on tertiary education by beginning with the generally agreed upon needed improvements at the middle land secondary levels (and returning Sixth Form secondary education to the high schools);
  2. preserving the admirable traditions of collaboration and academic excellence of the University of the West Indies, but redressing an imbalance of resources and attention by devoting more to the Caribbean region’s two and four year colleges;
  3. professionalize, strengthen, and above all de-politicize the management of colleges and universities in the Caribbean region;
  4. supplement scarce and coveted public revenues with modest and flexible forms of tuition and other fees–in spite of the inevitable opposition that always accompanies the introduction of cost-sharing in countries where higher education has been mainly free, but where governments can no longer sustain the needed quality or capacity of higher education on taxes alone;
  5. supplementing the above recommendation with an expansion of need-based grants and student loans (the last-named being a recommendation that needs the leadership of the Caribbean Development Bank).